Looking for the best Clickworker alternatives? If so, keep reading this article to discover useful apps and sites like Clickworker where you can do micro tasks for extra cash.

Clickworker is a popular micro-job marketplace that has helped millions of freelancers meet paying clients for simple task-based assignments.

Potential jobs on the platform include research, data categorization, mystery shopping, completing surveys, writing, and proofreading.

Freelancers get access to a categorized job pool and pick tasks suited for their skills and abilities. You can use your phone or computer, depending on the requirements of the task in question.

Clickworker doesn’t choose jobs for you. Your profile may, however, determine what tasks are displayed on your “Job Area” screen. Some more technical jobs are open to freelancers willing to undergo aptitude tests.

And how much can you expect to earn from Clickworker? Well, it depends. Task availability, complexity, and volume are all factors. Your availability will also have a sway.

You can, however, bank on the platform for $0.05-$10 per hour and up to $200 and an average of $52 per month, according to Swiftsalary.

Better paying jobs such UHRS tasks and AI training do not pop up often, so you can’t really hinge your earning hopes on them.

Does this seem like your ideal micro job platform? It doesn’t matter because it isn’t the only option at your disposal. This article discusses 15 websites like Clickworker that you may want to try.

Sites like Clickworker to find micro jobs

Don’t forget: Websites Like Remotasks

1. Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) 

MTurk and Clickworker are no apples and oranges from a freelancer’s viewpoint. They work similarly and offer the same kinds of jobs

On MTurk, these jobs are referred to as HITs, and they include data processing, information gathering, image processing, and data verification.

MTurk is owned by eCommerce giant Amazon, which besides connecting clients and freelancers, also contracts its workers to edit product listings for Amazon sellers. Those are extra HITs that I reckon give Mturk the edge over Clickworker.

A study by Cornell University researchers found that workers earn approximately $2 an hour.

Payments are made upon completion of a HIT.

2. Survey Junkie

Are you a survey specialist? If so, Clickworker may not be of as much value to you as Survey Junkie.

Offering $0.50-$3 micro jobs, the platform is a hub for a vast range of digital surveys. Your profile information and performance in previous surveys will determine your eligibility for jobs, though most of the work is available to everyone.

Signing up for the platform is free. Getting started is simple, and most jobs are doable even to complete novices.

Payment is in form of points, where a point is equivalent to a cent. Once your points add up to at least $5, you can redeem them for gift cards or PayPal cash.

3. Swagbucks

Swagbucks, like Survey Junkie, awards redeemable points for such tasks as watching videos, playing games, and shopping online.

These points, also called Swagbucks, are redeemable for sweepstakes entries, gift cards, and PayPal credit.

You need about 160 Swagbucks to be able to redeem your points, but this shouldn’t be difficult to accumulate since most tasks pay between 80 and 100 Swagbucks.

Swagbucks was founded in 2010 and has thus far gained 20M+ users and paid out upwards of $556 million in gift cards and cash.

Its standout features include an easy-to-use interface, multiple reward options, multiple ways to earn points, and the presence of cash-back options.

4. Gigwalk

Although Gigwalk offers various micro jobs, its main focus is mystery shopping. Thus, you must be ready to visit local stores to check the availability of certain products and see how they are priced.

Jobs are provided by retailers and marketers, but Gigwalk will serve as a go-between both for communication and confirmation that a freelancer indeed performed the task.

Albeit many retailers are not repeat customers and do not particularly post work in bulk, it is not uncommon for a project to pay as much as $100.

Of course, the higher-paying jobs require more time and effort. But you don’t require any technical skills for most of the work, so it’s about being industrious and consistent.

5. GigBucks

On GigBucks, you could earn between $5 and $50 per gig, making it one of the best-paying micro-job platforms.

The catch is that the marketplace doesn’t provide as many jobs as Clickworker, whose inclusive pay range magnetizes even clients on a budget. You also have to be well-versed in a field to earn from the higher-paying tasks.

The upside is that you can sell just about any gig on the platform and won’t be charged for it. Better yet, it’s the clients who look for freelancers, not the other way round. So if you don’t fancy bidding for work, GigBucks may be the way to go.

6. Zeerk

Zeerk is a generic micro-job platform open to freelancers from various niches, fields, and experience levels.

Like Clickworker, the platform lets freelancers create descriptive profiles detailing their skills and strengths. On the other hand, clients post jobs and choose an applicant to perform the task.

This can disadvantage newbies, but Zeerk undoes that by giving freelancers the freedom to set their prices. You can charge $2-$100 for a single task, meaning it’s possible to gain a competitive advantage by setting low prices.

Zeerk doesn’t have a withdrawal lower limit. You can withdraw any amount on any day for all approved work. You will, however, have to part with 10% of your earnings, which Zeerk cuts as service fees.

7. Microworkers

Microworkers is a crowdsourcing site that uses the same basic principle as Clickworker. Joining it is easy and free. In fact, you get paid a dollar just for setting up an account.

Learning your way around the Microworkers platform is effortless, thanks to a professional yet straightforward layout.

Jobs are well-described, and clients have a profile grade determined by the previous freelancers they have worked with.

It would be safe to say that Microworkers is a better payer than some of its rivals. For instance, you will be paid $0.30-$0.40 to favorite a YouTube video, whereas you would earn as little as $0.20 for the same task on MTurk.

Unfortunately, Microworkers may not have as many jobs for you as the said MTurks or Clickworker. There is also a $10 withdrawal limit, which may prove inconvenient.

8. Crowdtap

Crowdtap is a survey platform that pays you to take opinion polls. It partners with renowned brands like eBay, Sony, and Kraft and boasts a good working relationship with its clientele.

There is not much to complain about from the freelancers’ point of view either. Save for the lack of a mobile app, the platform performs well in aspects that matter to freelancers.

It offers many earning opportunities for freelancers and protects them against exploitation by ensuring surveys are short and manageable.

It also has an easy-to-use interface and excellent customer support, which will come in handy for you if you’re stuck.

Perhaps Crowdtap’s biggest downside is that it doesn’t pay in hard cash. Instead, it pays through points, which you can redeem at their store partners, including Amazon, Walmart, Target, and Adidas.

9. InboxDollars

Like Clickworker, InboxDollars is a marketplace for small-paying jobs like watching videos, playing games, reading emails, and taking surveys.

You get paid directly in hard cash and gift cards, though you have the option to earn cashback, access coupons, and receive free samples as an online shopper.

Tasks on InboxDollars pay between $0.25 and $5. Payments are made through PayPal and withdrawal is unrestricted for anyone with $15 or more in their account.

10. Appen

Appen serves retail companies seeking data for AI training. The data is used in various applications, including voice transcription, search result personalization, and image recognition.

Your work as an Appen freelancer is to perform web search evaluations, transcribe audio, translate text and audio, rate apps, etc. These can earn you up to $14 per hour, which is higher than most micro-job websites like Clickworker offer.

Despite a relatively high pay rate, Appen is still mostly a side-hustle platform as it is incredibly difficult for its users to work 40 hours a week. Nevertheless, it’s a legit site with a higher earning potential than most other alternatives on this list.

11. ySense

Initially known as ClixSense, ySense is a website like Clickworker that rewards users for completing surveys, shopping, and referring people.

Its parent company, Prodege, provides consumer insights to businesses, with its most notable clients being Gillette, Kraft, General Mills, and DoorDash.

Joining ySense is free for everyone, and jobs are available as soon as you complete the profile questionnaire.

Its standout features include a filter to narrow down the job options by time, popularity, and payout. Most jobs pay between $0.15 and $1 and have a time range of 3-15 minutes.

Of interest is that payouts don’t depend on survey length. Completion time is the main factor.

Payments are made through PayPal, Payoneer, and Skrill, and withdrawals can be done once you cross the $10, $52, and $5.05 thresholds, respectively.

12. UserTesting

UserTesting will pay you to test marketing materials, websites, and apps and give honest video feedback.

Every 20-minute review video you make will earn you a solid $10. The money is sent to you seven days after you complete the task.

Since reviews are in video, there are some prerequisites that might act as entry barriers to the platform.

Firstly, you need to be a fluent English speaker, something you’ll have to prove through a sample video. Secondly, you must be at least 18 years old.

Lastly, you won’t be able to start before your profile is approved. This takes days, and it is possible that you may never receive a response ever.

13. Spare5

Among sites and apps like Clickworker, Spare5 is arguably the fastest growing one. It is a subsidiary of Seattle-based Mighty AI, a company focusing on AI.

Spare5 is a mobile app whose primary objective is to provide clients with high-quality training data for artificial intelligence engines.

Understandably, joining the site is not as easy as you would desire. Applicants undergo a complex selection process involving clearing a set of qualifier tasks. Only those who complete the tasks with a required level of accuracy gain access to the pool of paid tasks.

Jobs pay differently. Mostly this will depend on task complexity, but it is not guaranteed that the lowest-paying jobs will be the easiest.

14. Lionbridge

If you can speak two or more languages and wish to launch yourself into the world of micro jobs, Smart Crowd/Lionbridge is an excellent place to start.

The website provides jobs related to data entry, data research, interpretation, and translation. It assists brands such as Microsoft, Pfizer, and Adobe process transactions, enhance the quality of internet services, etc.

Unlike Clickworker, which pays anytime a freelancer crosses a withdrawal threshold, Lionbridge pays once a month.

That may seem too infrequent, but since you can’t rely on micro jobs for a living, it doesn’t make much of a difference how often you’re paid.

All Lionbridge payments are issued through wire transfer.

15. Remotasks

Remotasks is a micro jobs platform and an excellent alternative to Clickworker. It has no particular point of focus, and tasks can range from content moderation and transcription to image tagging and annotation.

Compared to other websites like Clickworker, Remotasks is new in the game. Currently, it has just over 250K “taskers” and is available in just 90 countries.

To get started, you will need to set up a Remotasks account. It is free and simple. After that, you can access jobs and start working once you verify your email address.

Jobs pay between $1 and $3, with the pay rate depending on your submissions’ difficulty and accuracy. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) tasks pay the highest.

Conclusion

Micro jobs might not be lucrative enough to replace your day job, but they are good for experience and extra cash.

If you were looking for a place to start, any of the above sites are legitimate and could suffice. That shouldn’t stop you from doing some further research, though, as some sites are better aligned with your preferences than others.

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